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No Bad Days

For several years after my father died of cancer, I ran in the Terry Fox Run, in memory of him.

Today is World Cancer Day.  Every February 4 since 2000, this date has marked a global uniting initiative bringing awareness and action to bear upon a critical health and human issue.

For several years after my father died of cancer, I ran in the Terry Fox Run, in memory of him. It was there that I repeatedly met cancer survivors who told me of the slogan widely-adopted by those who have beaten the disease: “No bad days”.

Now, I often think of this phrase when I’m tempted to complain about circumstances in life. There are no “bad days,” if Romans 8:28 is true—“all things work together for good to those who love God and are called according to His purposes.”

Perhaps, as me, you can be encouraged by the life of the Old Testament patriarch Job, who—like cancer victims—had to face his mortality fairly and squarely.

Although Job experienced great suffering and great loss, he also exhibited great faith in God’s unchanging nature.

Job’s life teaches me to remind myself of what I know to be eternally true about God: He is loving, all-wise, powerful, present in every moment, and in control. Whether I live or die, I am in the Creator’s care.

Sometimes I’m troubled by trouble. And yes, like all of us, I will face the eventuality of death. But I’m thankful that circumstances cannot and do not change the character of God. I long to fully embrace an eternal perspective, affirming that there are “no bad days”—because there is a good God.

Joanne Pepper is Associate Professor and Coordinator of Intercultural Religious Studies at TWU. She has lived and worked in countries in Western and Eastern Europe, East Africa, Southeast Asia and Latin America. She was born in and currently lives in British Columbia.